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Sadomonetarists vs Masomonetarists?

06 May

Sadomonetarist? [courtesy Google Images]

Sadomonetarist?
[courtesy Google Images]

There’s something wrong with the Nobel Prize Committee in Sweden.  They’ve issued Nobel Prizes to former Vice President Al Gore for making a Power Point presentation on Global Warming (or was if for inventing the internet?), . . .  to President Obama for being black, . . . and to Paul Krugman for economics.

It’s hard to say which of these Nobel Prizes is more absurd.  You might think that a Nobel Prize to Mr. Krugman for economics makes some sense since, after all, Mr. Krugman does have a PhD in economics.

But judging from Mr. Krugman’s recent comments, it’s beginning to appear that Mr. Krugman may have purchased his PhD from some online university.

For example, a recent article from Casey Daily Dispatch reports:

 

“If you favor sound money, you’re a sadomonetarist, according to New York Times columnist Paul Krugman. The Nobel Prize winner says he doesn’t use the term ‘just to be colorful.’ No, he uses the term ‘advisedly,’ and defines it as ‘an attitude, common among monetary officials and commentators, that involves a visceral dislike for low interest rates and easy money, even when unemployment is high and inflation is low.’”

Well, I’m a bit of a “commentator,” and my “visceral dislike” is not for low interest rates or even “easy money”.  (What sort of beast would object to “easy money”?)

My visceral dislike is for robbing creditors with lies andfiat currencies.

My visceral dislike is for fiat currency since our fiat monetary system has expanded the size and power of the government to the detriment of America’s prosperity and liberty.  My visceral dislike for fiat current is based on the fact that the fiat currency is implicitly prohibited by Article 1.10.1 of the Constitution of the United States.

My visceral dislike for fiat currency is based on the fact that all fiat currencies fail; our fiat dollar will eventually fail (and maybe not so long from now), collapse our economy and possibly plunge our nation into chaos or even disintegration.

It may be true that my “visceral dislike” for fiat currency makes me “sadomontetarist“.  But if so, it also follows that Paul Krugman and those who believe his claptrap in support of fiat currency, low interest rates and “easy money” are “masomontarists” who have a visceral desire to live in a world where robbing creditors, destruction of the American dream, economic collapse and possible national disintegration are commonplace, painful but still desirable.

Krugman’s “masomonetarists” are guilty of “levying war” against The United States of America or at least giving “aid and comfort” to our enemies.  They are thus guilty of treason.

I don’t know what, exactly, the Nobel Prize Committee is guilty of, but somebody’s gotta make ’em stop handing out Nobel Prizes to morons.  (Who knows?  Maybe their next Nobel Prize will go to G.W. Bush for being the world’s best painter.)

 

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6 responses to “Sadomonetarists vs Masomonetarists?

  1. harrytapp

    May 6, 2014 at 11:19 PM

    Could it be that its their job to hand them out and this is the best they have to work with :-)

     
  2. henry

    May 8, 2014 at 10:14 AM

    Before money was invented the people used barter: If you paint my cave I will give you some chickens, if you build me a house I will give you some cows, if you do something good for me then I will do something good for you. Money is goodness tokens. House builders preferred tokens over cows.

    Many mediums were used as money over the millennium. Gold and silver have advantages and disadvantages over others. There is a limited supply of it. This has a positive aspect that the goodness that one does to receive a specific amount of the metal will be available for exchange when they get old and can no longer create goods and services. In short, the goodness will retain it’s value. There is also a negative aspect: If the economy (the amount of goodness created) grows faster than the supply of new metal then it discourages investment (loaning the metal out to create goodness).

    People did not like to carry metal around with them so they put it a depository. The depository receipt were exchanged as if it was metal. The owners of the depositories realized that few people came to get their metal so they created more receipts and loaned out the receipts at interests. This had the effect of changing the money supply. The positive effect of this was that the economy expanded and the negative was that the goodness of the people were stolen by inflation and when the depositories/banks collapsed. If you have a basket of goods on one side of a scale and a basket of money on the other, increasing the amount of money will cause the cost of goods to increase proportionately. So, the goodness that you created will be diluted. In short, the bankers will steal your goodness.

    At a magic show, the magician performs tricks. The audience knows that the lady does not get cut in half but it looks as if she does. This is a trick – the performer is not breaking the rules of the universe (magic). Children may think that the magician is real. The tricks that the bankers do are tricks but children, of all ages, think that magic is really happening. The latest development is that the bankers actually believe that they are doing magic. They don’t know it is a trick. They cut the lady in half and she dies and a new lady is brought out. It is not clear to me that Krugman knows what is going on and is trying to fool the children or he doesn’t know the reality of the trick. Either way, he is dangerous. People will die because of his efforts.

    The banksters are magicians. They have the pretty assistant distracting you while do the mechanics of the trick. They own the Nobel committee, the President, the Congress, the TV and movie studios, the “public schools”, and the newspapers. The goal is to make sure that you do not grow up. If you do, you will see their tricks and not fall for them.

     
    • EarlatOregon

      May 10, 2014 at 2:01 PM

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      Money used thru the Centuries:
      .

      Rome used to Pay the Soldiers in Salt,
      that is why we use the word Salary,
      it comes from the Latin for Salt.
      .
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      Salt will be a Useful and Important commodity,
      Salt preserves Meat,
      and it does so many other things,

      It is great Trading stock.
      .
      .
      .

      Before refrigeration,
      when the meatpacking and food processing industries were in their infancy,
      salt was the primary means of preserving meat and fish for future consumption.

      It took two bushels, about 110 pounds, of salt
      to cure 1,000 pounds of pork,
      and 1.25 bushels to cure 500 pounds of beef.

      And salt was useful in myriad other ways,
      from tanning leather to fixing the dyes in clothes
      and feeding livestock.

      .
      .
      .

      Americans in the mid-19th century
      annually consumed about 50 pounds of salt per capita
      .
      .

      http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/26/the-salt-wars/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
      .
      .
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      50 lbs per person per year.
      .
      .

      Salt is less than $5 for 40 lbs.

      Salt is great Trading stock.
      .
      .
      .
      .
      .

       
    • EarlatOregon

      May 10, 2014 at 2:17 PM

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      Quote Good enough to Repeat:
      by Henry
      .
      .

      The banksters are magicians.

      They have the pretty assistant distracting you while do the mechanics of the trick.

      They own the Nobel committee,
      the President, the Congress,
      the TV and movie studios,
      the “public schools”, and the newspapers.

      The goal is to make sure that you do not Grow Up.

      If you Do,
      you will See their tricks and not fall for them.
      .
      .
      .
      .
      .

       
  3. EarlatOregon

    May 10, 2014 at 2:06 PM

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    Solve It with Salt:
    110 Surprising and Ingenious Household Uses for Table Salt
    .
    .
    .

    http://www.amazon.com/Solve-Salt-Surprising-Ingenious-Household/dp/0609802348/ref=sr_1_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1399748709&sr=1-9&keywords=salt+uses
    .
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  4. EarlatOregon

    May 10, 2014 at 2:10 PM

    The war over Salt
    was ultimately just one small part of the Union’s strategy
    of Economic Starvation against the South.
    .
    .
    [(Why does that seem familiar?)]
    .
    .

    But its extent and viciousness
    demonstrated the extent to which many Union officers and soldiers
    – not just those on the hills of Georgia or eastern Virginia –
    were willing to grind the South into submission.
    .
    .

    http://opinionator.blogs.NyTimes.com/2013/12/26/the-salt-wars/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
    .
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    .

     

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