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Category Archives: Federal Reserve

Debt-Based Monetary System Demands Ever More Debt—Part IV—“Why”?


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BUT WHYYYYY?!

In the first three “Parts” of this article (#1 More Debt, #2 Ponzi Schemes, & #3 Fractional Reserve Banking), I explored and advanced an hypothesis concerning America’s National Debt. I argued that our National Debt isn’t growing due to accident or governmental incompetence. Instead, I argued that that our seemingly uncontrollable National Debt (it nearly doubled under the Obama administration) grows out of a mathematical necessity that’s somehow caused by our Debt-Based Monetary System (DBMS).

In essence, I believe that our DBMS forces our National Debt to grow as a necessity and requirement. The the DBMS will die if it’s not constantly fed an growing stream of debt. If the DBMS dies, it will kill our debt-based economy.

More, I suspect that the debt must not only grow, but must grow “geometrically” or, at least, it must grow faster than the economy. If that’s true, it’s the the kiss of death for the DBMS and our debt-based economy.

Our DBMS (Debt-Based Monetary System) doesn’t simply make more debt possible, it makes more debt necessary. If we fail or refuse to go deeper into debt, our DBMS and economy will collapse into chaos.

If my hypothesis is roughly correct, it means that any promise by the Republican Party or President Trump to eliminate deficit spending and/or reduce the National Debt from $20 trillion to, say, $19 trillion—is not only false, but potentially dangerous. If they succeed in significantly reducing the National Debt, I believe that reduction could cause our debt-based economy to collapse.

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Debt-Based Monetary System Demands Ever More Debt—Part III—Fractional Reserve Banking


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The FOUNDATION for our Debt-Based Monetary System:  PROMISES to Pay that Can’t Possibly be Kept.

For the past several months, I’ve been exploring an hypothesis that strikes me as fantastic, unlikely and yet (probably) true. In broad strokes, it’s the idea that our fiat, debt-based monetary system requires ever more total debt to function.  Going deeper into debt is not optional; we are forced by our debt-based monetary system to do so.  I.e., if the American people ever stop going deeper into debt, the whole debt-based monetary and economic system will collapse like a junkie forced to quit heroin cold turkey.

If my hypothesis is roughly correct, the persistent growth in the National Debt (it nearly doubled under Obama) is not the result of governmental negligence or self-serving politicians who get elected by promising more “free lunches” (services purchased with debt). Instead, our National Debt must increase (perhaps geometrically) in order to feed, protect and sustain our debt-based currency and economy.

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Debt-Based Monetary System Demands Ever More Debt—Part II—Ponzi Schemes?


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Is our Debt-Based Monetary System a Ponzi Scheme?  [Courtesy Google Images]

Recently, in Part I of this series, I promised that in Part II, I’d explain “why” the survival of our debt-based monetary system (DBMS) depends on the creation of ever more debt. I argued that our massive National Debt is not an accident or evidence of political malfeasance, but rather an intentional and necessary consequence of accepting our debt-based monetary system (DBMS). I argued that our DBMS can’t survive without going ever deeper into debt.

I compared “payments” (which are tangible, real assets like gold or silver coins) to “promises to pay” (which are intangible, paper debt-instruments like paper dollars). I warned that, given the choice between receiving a tangible “payment” and an intangible “promise to pay,” only a fool would take the paper “promises to pay”.

I illustrated my argument about “promises to pay” by reminding readers of how many times they had made or received promises that had failed. My point was that promises are easily made and routinely broken.

So, I suppose it should come as no surprise that my promise to use this week’s article to explain the “why” behind the debt-based monetary scheme will also be broken. I began to write this second article with some background on “Ponzi Schemes” (which is how I and others frequently describe our DBMS).  But, when I looked into “Ponzi Schemes,” I discovered that maybe that’s not the most accurate way to describe our DBMS. I also realized that maybe I should try to discern and describe the nature of our DBMS before I got into the “why”.

Result? Here, in Part II of this series of articles we’re going to explore whether our DBMS is really a “Ponzi Scheme” or if it’s something else. Then, in Part III (coming soon) I’ll present my notions concerning the fundamental “why”.

I promise.

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Economics: Science or Séance?


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Janet Yellen calls Federal Reserve meeting to order

Jim Cramer is a former hedge fund manager and best-selling author. He’s the host of CNBC’s Mad Money TV show and a co-founder of TheStreet, Inc.

According to CNBC, with oil prices on the rise, Cramer recently used technician Carolyn Boroden’s charts to try to determine,

[W]hether the uptick in crude oil prices is just a one-off [an aberration or anomaly] or if it’s time to get bullish.”

Note that when it comes to investing in crude oil, Cramer apparently sees just two choices:

1) Stand pat since the rising price is a “one-off” and nothing major is really happening; or,

2) Jump in with both feet since the oil market is really changing to become significantly bullish.

However, there’s a third possibility that Cramer has ignored but others who invest in crude oil should consider: while crude oil’s near-term price is volatile and might go up or down, crude oil’s mid- to long-term price might be falling.

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Letters From the Past I


Silver Certificate vs FRN [courtesy Google Images]

Silver Certificate vs FRN–which one is “money”?
[courtesy Google Images]

Most people suppose that the concept of “money” is easy-peasy. What more do you need to know besides how to count it?

Well, there’s a lot more to money than mere counting. If all you know about money is how to count it, you don’t really have a clue.

The relevant information is deep, obscure, profound and confusing. The confusion isn’t accidental. The Powers That Be don’t want you to understand the nature of money because, if you did, you’d know that your government is mostly a racket.

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What follows is an analysis of the first of three letters written to the Treasury Department from people who wanted to understand our monetary system.

In the 1990s, I had photocopies of these three letters allegedly written by officials of the U.S. Department of The Treasury discussing the nature of Federal Reserve notes (FRN’s). Those copies disappeared in a house fire. I can’t prove the photocopies were legitimate, but I have no doubt that they were. They were (and are) important because they helped fuel my interest in learning about the nature of money.

The dates on the first two letters were A.D. 1977 and A.D. 1982; the third letter’s date was unclear. Assuming these letters were legitimate and the statements they contain accurate, they offered some surprising insights into the realities of our current money system.

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An English Politician’s View of Central Banks


Is criticism of central banking an idea whose time has come?

video      00:01:55

 

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“Helicopter Money”


Helicopter Money [courtesy Google Images]

Helicopter Money
[courtesy Google Images]

Control of the economy is based on two sets of powers:

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1) The Federal Reserve wields the monetary powers which include control over interest rate and over the supply of currency.

2) The U.S. government wields the fiscal powers which include raising or lowering taxes, raising or lowering borrowing, and increasing or decreasing government spending on benefits, subsidies and wars.

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For the past year, we’ve heard the Federal Reserve say repeatedly that:

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1) The Federal Reserve has exhausted its monetary powers and is no longer capable of using previous, “conventional” monetary strategies like QE (Quantitative Easing; printing and injecting more currency into the economy) and ZIRP (near-Zero Interest Rate Policy) to stimulate the economy back to a “recovery”.

I believe the Federal Reserve’s claims that it’s currently helpless to do much more to “stimulate” the economy with monetary policy are true.

If the Fed’s not fibbing, then only the U.S. government remains to engineer an economic “recovery” by means of its fiscal policy. However,

2) The U.S. government is unwilling or unable use its fiscal powers to raise taxes and/or borrow more currency to provide enough additional “stimulation” to cause an economic recovery.

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