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Category Archives: Gold & Silver Coin

Silver’s Future


CrystalBall1NEWSMAX reports that in A.D. 2012, America’s largest investment bank (JPMorgan Chase & Co.) held 5 million ounces of silver. Today, JPM holds a staggering 91.5 million ounces of silver! In just 5 years, JPM increased their stockpile 1700%.

In the first three months of A.D. 2017, JPM reportedly purchased 9.4 million ounces of silver. That’s an average purchase of over 3 million ounces per month. JPM clearly believes that silver’s price will rise.

Since A.D. 2000, silver has enjoyed an average annual growth of 10%. Plus, we know that silver can go to $48 per ounce, as it did in 1980 and 2011.”

More, since 2000, silver supplies have been in a deficit every single year. That means the supply of silver has not kept up with the growing demand for over 17 years and is unlikely to do so in the foreseeable future. Diminished supplies coupled with growing demand means higher prices.

Financial expert John Rubino believes that silver could exceed $100 per ounce. According to Rubino, the silver market is so small that if even a relatively modest amount of currency (“a few tens of billions of dollars”) flows into the silver market, the price of silver could start jumping by “$5 or $10 per ounce per day”.

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Letters From the Past I


Silver Certificate vs FRN [courtesy Google Images]

Silver Certificate vs FRN–which one is “money”?
[courtesy Google Images]

Most people suppose that the concept of “money” is easy-peasy. What more do you need to know besides how to count it?

Well, there’s a lot more to money than mere counting. If all you know about money is how to count it, you don’t really have a clue.

The relevant information is deep, obscure, profound and confusing. The confusion isn’t accidental. The Powers That Be don’t want you to understand the nature of money because, if you did, you’d know that your government is mostly a racket.

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What follows is an analysis of the first of three letters written to the Treasury Department from people who wanted to understand our monetary system.

In the 1990s, I had photocopies of these three letters allegedly written by officials of the U.S. Department of The Treasury discussing the nature of Federal Reserve notes (FRN’s). Those copies disappeared in a house fire. I can’t prove the photocopies were legitimate, but I have no doubt that they were. They were (and are) important because they helped fuel my interest in learning about the nature of money.

The dates on the first two letters were A.D. 1977 and A.D. 1982; the third letter’s date was unclear. Assuming these letters were legitimate and the statements they contain accurate, they offered some surprising insights into the realities of our current money system.

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What Can’t Be Paid, Won’t Be Paid


National Debt Creditors About to Lose their Assets [courtesy Google Image]

National Debt Creditors About to Lose their Assets
[courtesy Google Image]

I’ve argued for five years that the U.S. National Debt is too great to ever be repaid in full, or even by half.  My personal guesstimate is that at least 80%–and probably 90%–of the National Debt will inevitably be repudiated.  That repudiation will take the form of hyperinflation, express repudiation (“Sorry, boys–but we’re too broke to pay that debt.”), or perhaps even WWIII (a good war could wipe out virtually all memory and enforce-ability of the National Debt.).

Here’s a graphic that illustrates my argument.  If you take a few minutes to view the graphic, you’ll see the size of the U.S. National Debt is:

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1. Larger than the 500 largest public companies in America;

2. Larger than all assets managed by the world’s top seven money managers;

3.  25X larger than all global oil exports in 2015;

4. 155x larger than all gold mined globally in a year; and, my personal favorite:

5. Larger than all of the world’s physical currency, gold, silver, and bitcoin combined.
In other words, there’s not enough actual money and currency in the world to repay the U.S. National Debt.
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The Gold Imperative


Got Gold? [courtesy Google Images]

Got Gold?
[courtesy Google Images]

Gold-Eagle.com published an article entitled “The Inflation Imperative” which stated in part that:

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“The western welfare states (US, UK, EU etc.) have borrowed more digital currency than can be repaid at current values. The choices are:

“1. Massive inflation: a bad choice.

“2. Default: an even worse choice.”

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In fact, these two choices could be more clearly expressed as:

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1. Covert debt default by means of massive inflation: a bad choice

2. Overt debt default: an even worse choice.

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When the Debt Hits the Fan


[courtesy Google Images]

[courtesy Google Images]

Business Insider published an article entitled “Americans have $12.29 trillion of debt”. That article reported:

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“Americans are still adding debt.

Household debt—which includes things as varied as mortgages and credit cards—increased to $12.29 trillion in the second quarter of 2016, an increase of $35 billion, or 0.3%, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit.

“The biggest increases came from auto debt and credit-card debt, which ticked up by $32 billion and $17 billion.

Mortgages, the largest section of household debt, actually decreased in the second quarter, according to the New York Fed. The decrease in mortgage debt seems to be driven by more people paying down their balances, as new mortgage debt continued to tick up.

Student-loan debt decreased by $2 billion, to $1.259 trillion . . . .”

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According to Bloomberg, total U.S. corporate debt is about $30 trillion. The “official” U.S. national debt is about $20 trillion. Added together, that means the total U.S. household, corporate and government debt is at least $62 trillion.

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Good News/Bad News for English Pensioners


[courtesy Google Images]

[courtesy Google Images]

24hgold.com reports in “UK’s Royal Mint will sell pension investors gold they can never see” that,

“The Royal Mint in England is to open up its gold vaults to UK pension investors. The Royal Mint will make some of its gold bars available to investors wanting to hold it in tax-efficient pension pots.

“For UK citizens, this is the first time that Royal Mint gold bullion has been authorised by HM [Her Majesty’s] Revenue & Customs . . . for holding in specific pensions.

“Investors are to be offered a choice of bullion, from Royal Mint Refinery 100-gram and 1-kilogram bars, to Signature Gold—a service that allows customers to purchase and own a share of a 400-ounce gold bar.”

Sounds pretty good. However, here comes the punch line:

“Pension investors purchasing gold bars through the Royal Mint will not be able to take delivery of their purchases as they will be placed in storage in ‘The Vault,’ the Royal Mint’s secure storage facility in Wales.”

And, according to the title of the article, pension investors won’t be able to even see the gold they’ve allegedly purchased.

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Gambling For Gold


The COMEX Golden Roulette Wheel [courtesy Google Images]

The COMEX Golden Roulette Wheel
[courtesy Google Images]

Reportedly, there are more than 540 ounce of “paper gold” for every 1 ounce of physical gold at COMEX,  That means that there are 540 paper claims for every 1 ounce of physical gold at COMEX.

Is COMEX really a “market”?  Or, given that only 1 claim out of 540 can actually “win” an ounce of physical gold, is COMEX really a lottery?

Or maybe, we should call COMEX a “raffle” similar to those held by a school to raffle off a new car.  Five thousand people buy a raffle ticket for $10 each, but only one of them will win the car.  Similarly, with COMEX, 540 “investors” each purchase a paper claim on one ounce of physical gold, but only 1 of the 540 can actually win that ounce.

Is gambling illegal in New York?

Could COMEX be sued for running an unlicensed lottery or unlicensed raffle?

What about the London Gold Market?  As you’ll see from the following graphic, the London Gold Market is every bit as much of a casino as COMEX.

The following graphic makes clear that the London Bullion Market is the principle source of the world’s “paper gold” and principle mechanism for suppressing the free-market price of physical gold.

If something were to “happen” to ruin, wreck or destroy the London Bullion Market, the price of physical gold might skyrocket.

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