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Debt-Based Monetary System Demands Ever More Debt—Part IV—“Why”?


Thinker2

BUT WHYYYYY?!

In the first three “Parts” of this article (#1 More Debt, #2 Ponzi Schemes, & #3 Fractional Reserve Banking), I explored and advanced an hypothesis concerning America’s National Debt. I argued that our National Debt isn’t growing due to accident or governmental incompetence. Instead, I argued that that our seemingly uncontrollable National Debt (it nearly doubled under the Obama administration) grows out of a mathematical necessity that’s somehow caused by our Debt-Based Monetary System (DBMS).

In essence, I believe that our DBMS forces our National Debt to grow as a necessity and requirement. The the DBMS will die if it’s not constantly fed an growing stream of debt. If the DBMS dies, it will kill our debt-based economy.

More, I suspect that the debt must not only grow, but must grow “geometrically” or, at least, it must grow faster than the economy. If that’s true, it’s the the kiss of death for the DBMS and our debt-based economy.

Our DBMS (Debt-Based Monetary System) doesn’t simply make more debt possible, it makes more debt necessary. If we fail or refuse to go deeper into debt, our DBMS and economy will collapse into chaos.

If my hypothesis is roughly correct, it means that any promise by the Republican Party or President Trump to eliminate deficit spending and/or reduce the National Debt from $20 trillion to, say, $19 trillion—is not only false, but potentially dangerous. If they succeed in significantly reducing the National Debt, I believe that reduction could cause our debt-based economy to collapse.

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Robot Blitzkrieg


Robot8blitzkrieg /blits-krēɡ/ noun an intense military campaign intended to bring about a swift victory.”

24hGOLD (“How many Jobs Do Robots Destroy?”) wrote:

How many jobs do robots – whether mechanical robots or software – destroy? Do these destroyed jobs get replaced by the Great American Economy with better jobs? That’s the big discussion these days.

So far, the answers have been soothing. Economists cite the industrial revolution [A.D. 1760 to 1840]. At the time, most humans replaced by machines found better paid, more productive, less back-breaking jobs. Productivity soared and, despite some big dislocations, society prospered. Some say the same principle applies today.”

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Posted by on April 21, 2017 in Robots, Technology, Uncategorized

 

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Passive Investing Destroys “Price Discovery”


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Courtesy Google Images

 

ZERO HEDGE published an article entitled, “Hedge Fund CIO: “Expect Enormous Losses In The Next Correction As There Is No Price Discovery In Index Investing”. According to that article,

The CIO [Chief Investment Officer] of One River Asset Management spoke on the one topic that is first and foremost on the minds of the active investing community: the unprecedented shift from active to passive management, and what it means for not only the industry, but for markets during the next “normal correction.”

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Posted by on April 21, 2017 in Economy, Investment, Market Panics, Uncategorized

 

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Economics: Science or Séance?


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Janet Yellen calls Federal Reserve meeting to order

Jim Cramer is a former hedge fund manager and best-selling author. He’s the host of CNBC’s Mad Money TV show and a co-founder of TheStreet, Inc.

According to CNBC, with oil prices on the rise, Cramer recently used technician Carolyn Boroden’s charts to try to determine,

[W]hether the uptick in crude oil prices is just a one-off [an aberration or anomaly] or if it’s time to get bullish.”

Note that when it comes to investing in crude oil, Cramer apparently sees just two choices:

1) Stand pat since the rising price is a “one-off” and nothing major is really happening; or,

2) Jump in with both feet since the oil market is really changing to become significantly bullish.

However, there’s a third possibility that Cramer has ignored but others who invest in crude oil should consider: while crude oil’s near-term price is volatile and might go up or down, crude oil’s mid- to long-term price might be falling.

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Silver’s Future


CrystalBall1NEWSMAX reports that in A.D. 2012, America’s largest investment bank (JPMorgan Chase & Co.) held 5 million ounces of silver. Today, JPM holds a staggering 91.5 million ounces of silver! In just 5 years, JPM increased their stockpile 1700%.

In the first three months of A.D. 2017, JPM reportedly purchased 9.4 million ounces of silver. That’s an average purchase of over 3 million ounces per month. JPM clearly believes that silver’s price will rise.

Since A.D. 2000, silver has enjoyed an average annual growth of 10%. Plus, we know that silver can go to $48 per ounce, as it did in 1980 and 2011.”

More, since 2000, silver supplies have been in a deficit every single year. That means the supply of silver has not kept up with the growing demand for over 17 years and is unlikely to do so in the foreseeable future. Diminished supplies coupled with growing demand means higher prices.

Financial expert John Rubino believes that silver could exceed $100 per ounce. According to Rubino, the silver market is so small that if even a relatively modest amount of currency (“a few tens of billions of dollars”) flows into the silver market, the price of silver could start jumping by “$5 or $10 per ounce per day”.

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Consumer Confidence Foretells Economic Crash?


Consumer9

Consumer Confidence

 

Anyone who stops to think about it knows that the fundamental strategy for generating investment profits is to buy an investment when the price is low and sell when that investment’s price is high. The name of that strategy is “buy-low/sell-high”. The difference between the “buy low” price (say, $100) and the “sell high” price (say $300) is the measure of the profit ($200, in this example) made on the investment.

No one seeking investment profits can refute the “buy-low/sell-high” strategy. On considering that strategy, virtually everyone will say, “Well, of course,” or “Obviously” or even “Well, duh”.

However, the buy-low/sell-high” strategy isn’t as simple as it sounds. There’s a problem: investors like to behave like herd animals. We are generally and genetically afraid to act independently. We feel more comfortable believing someone else (especially an “expert”) than we do in trusting our own eyes and ears. Insofar as that tendency is prevalent, investors are prone to ignore the buy-low/sell-high strategy and instead “buy high” (when virtually everyone is buying and says “now’s the time to buy”) and “sell low” (when virtually everyone is selling at a low price). This “sell-low/buy-high” strategy is a sure formula for going broke. I.e., most investors tend to “buy high” (when the investment’s price is $300) and “sell low” (when the price is $100) and thereby suffer a $200 loss.

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Welcome to Monetary “Darnation”


RockHardPlace1Most economists agree that America’s hope of future prosperity has been compromised by America’s debt. The currency we spend paying the principal or even just the interest on the existing National Debt is currency that we can’t spend investing in new factories or technologies that would increase our productivity and therefore our prosperity.

So long as the National Debt remains or, worse, grows—America will continue to slide towards austerity rather than prosperity.

But, it’s not just America that’s overly indebted. The world is awash in debt. That debt is reducing global productivity and prosperity.

If America—and the world—would become prosperous again, something’s got to be done about paying or otherwise eliminating our excessive National (and global) Debt.

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Posted by on March 17, 2017 in Uncategorized