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Tag Archives: Debt

Debt-Based Monetary System Demands Ever More Debt—Part IV—“Why”?


Thinker2

BUT WHYYYYY?!

In the first three “Parts” of this article (#1 More Debt, #2 Ponzi Schemes, & #3 Fractional Reserve Banking), I explored and advanced an hypothesis concerning America’s National Debt. I argued that our National Debt isn’t growing due to accident or governmental incompetence. Instead, I argued that that our seemingly uncontrollable National Debt (it nearly doubled under the Obama administration) grows out of a mathematical necessity that’s somehow caused by our Debt-Based Monetary System (DBMS).

In essence, I believe that our DBMS forces our National Debt to grow as a necessity and requirement. The the DBMS will die if it’s not constantly fed an growing stream of debt. If the DBMS dies, it will kill our debt-based economy.

More, I suspect that the debt must not only grow, but must grow “geometrically” or, at least, it must grow faster than the economy. If that’s true, it’s the the kiss of death for the DBMS and our debt-based economy.

Our DBMS (Debt-Based Monetary System) doesn’t simply make more debt possible, it makes more debt necessary. If we fail or refuse to go deeper into debt, our DBMS and economy will collapse into chaos.

If my hypothesis is roughly correct, it means that any promise by the Republican Party or President Trump to eliminate deficit spending and/or reduce the National Debt from $20 trillion to, say, $19 trillion—is not only false, but potentially dangerous. If they succeed in significantly reducing the National Debt, I believe that reduction could cause our debt-based economy to collapse.

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What Can’t Be Paid, Won’t Be Paid


National Debt Creditors About to Lose their Assets [courtesy Google Image]

National Debt Creditors About to Lose their Assets
[courtesy Google Image]

I’ve argued for five years that the U.S. National Debt is too great to ever be repaid in full, or even by half.  My personal guesstimate is that at least 80%–and probably 90%–of the National Debt will inevitably be repudiated.  That repudiation will take the form of hyperinflation, express repudiation (“Sorry, boys–but we’re too broke to pay that debt.”), or perhaps even WWIII (a good war could wipe out virtually all memory and enforce-ability of the National Debt.).

Here’s a graphic that illustrates my argument.  If you take a few minutes to view the graphic, you’ll see the size of the U.S. National Debt is:

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1. Larger than the 500 largest public companies in America;

2. Larger than all assets managed by the world’s top seven money managers;

3.  25X larger than all global oil exports in 2015;

4. 155x larger than all gold mined globally in a year; and, my personal favorite:

5. Larger than all of the world’s physical currency, gold, silver, and bitcoin combined.
In other words, there’s not enough actual money and currency in the world to repay the U.S. National Debt.
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The Gold Imperative


Got Gold? [courtesy Google Images]

Got Gold?
[courtesy Google Images]

Gold-Eagle.com published an article entitled “The Inflation Imperative” which stated in part that:

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“The western welfare states (US, UK, EU etc.) have borrowed more digital currency than can be repaid at current values. The choices are:

“1. Massive inflation: a bad choice.

“2. Default: an even worse choice.”

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In fact, these two choices could be more clearly expressed as:

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1. Covert debt default by means of massive inflation: a bad choice

2. Overt debt default: an even worse choice.

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Promises, Promises


What Can't Be Paid, Won't be Paid [courtesy Google Images]

What Can’t Be Paid,
Won’t be Paid
[courtesy Google Images]

Last month (July), AFP published an article entitled “Japan PM unveils $266 bn stimulus plan to boost economy”. According to that article,

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Japan’s government and central bank have come under increasing pressure to do more for the economy.

“Therefore, [in July] Japan’s government announced a stimulus package worth more than 28 trillion yen ($266 billion) in its latest attempt to fire up the lukewarm economy . . . .”

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By itself, $266 billion in government stimulus doesn’t strike me as significant. Back around 2008-2009, the U.S. government injected $800 billion into the U.S. economy under QE1. Later, under QE3, the government injected $80 billion per month (almost $1 trillion per year) into the economy. These injections may have postponed a U.S. economic depression, but they didn’t generate much of an economic recovery.

Given that Japan is the world’s third largest economy, I don’t expect $266 billion (just one-third of the $800 billion injected during the U.S. QE1) to have much more effect on Japan’s economy than QE1 had on the U.S. economy.

This implies that Prime Minister Abe’s proposed “stimulus package” is more of a gesture to “do something” rather than a real economic remedy for the stagnating Japanese economy.

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Monetary Madness Part I—Negative Interest Rates


Negative Interest Rates-- Heading for Hell? [courtesy Google Images]

Negative Interest Rates–
Taking us towards Hell?
[courtesy Google Images]

The fundamental premise underlying negative-interest rate bonds is that lenders pay government borrowers for the “privilege” of lending to government. Based on this premise, governments receive loans at less than the face value of the bond. For example, if you loaned $100,000 to the government on a negative-interest loan, you might only receive, say, $98,000 when you redeemed that bond. You’d lose $2,000 for the privilege of lending to the government.

In all of world history, I doubt that there’s ever before been a time when lenders paid borrowers for the privilege of lending money.

The world is embracing negative-interest rate bonds for the first time. That fact is not evidence of economic creativity and financial innovation so much as evidence of desperation and the financial madness that lies at the heart of debt-based monetary and economic systems.

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A few facts about negative-yield bonds:

According to Bank of America Merrill Lynch, the global amount of government bonds having negative yields is now $13 trillion,.

Just two years ago, there were virtually zero negative-interest rate bonds. The subsequent, two-year rise to $13 trillion is unprecedented.

In February A.D. 2015, the total amount of negative-interest debt was $3.6 trillion.

By February A.D. 2016 that negative-interest debt had nearly doubled to $7 trillion.

In the five months since February, A.D. 2016, the amount of negative-yielding bonds nearly doubled again to $13 trillion.

The spread of negative-yielding bonds is unprecedented, fantastic and accelerating.

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Tragi-Comic Greece Illuminates “Austerity”


Tragi-Comic Masks--a Greek Invention [courtesy Google Images]

Tragi-Comic Masks–a Greek Invention
[courtesy Google Images]

Reuters wrote in May (“Euro zone: more time needed for Greek reforms”):

Euro zone finance ministers will not meet on Thursday and need more time to discuss Greek reforms that would unlock new loans, signaling significant differences remain between Athens and its lenders on bailout targets.”

Signaling”?!

Signaling significant differences?!“

Bunk.

What they’re signaling in this “never-ending story” is that Greece will never be both willing and able to repay its existing national debts—and neither side wants to admit that truth.

What they’re “signaling” is that the EU creditors refuse to face reality: Greece is bankrupt. Therefore, Greece should be allowed to file for bankruptcy because it can’t possibly repay its existing debt. Greece should be allowed to rebuild its economy without repaying existing EU debt obligations—and also without going deeper into debt.

What they’re “signaling” is the creditors’ refusal to admit that “what can’t be paid, won’t be paid”.

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“Reset” Coming? What’s a “Reset”?


[courtesy Google Images]

[courtesy Google Images]

Greg Hunter (USAwatchdog.com) recently interviewed Rob Kirby (Kirby Analytics) in a 30-minute video. During the interview, Kirby predicted a coming economic and/or monetary “reset”.

According to Kirby,

“Today, we see China, Russia, India and others are moving to protect themselves from the systemic risk of the over-printed dollar. It’s become clear to many that the dollar’s world-reserve-currency status cannot last. It’s just a matter of time before the entire currency system will face a radical reset reflecting today’s reality.”

A “radical reset” is coming. Sounds kinda scary. But, what, exactly, is a “reset”?

Kirby continued:

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